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Consumer Purchases

When you buy a product or service, the Consumer Protection Act gives you the right to assume several things about the transaction.

New Regulations for Wireless Telecommunications Contracts coming May 1, 2013

Top Five Consumer Benefits:

  • Reasonable Cancellation Fees
  • Minimum monthly cost disclosed in ads and contract
  • No unilateral contract changes from suppliers (unless they benefit the customer)
  • Contracts will not automatically renew
  • Consumer must get a copy of the contract before it starts

Starting May 1, cell phone providers must provide consumers with information about responsible cell phone use. Download your own copy below.

Purchaser Rights in Nova Scotia

In the case of buying a product, you can assume that:

  • the seller has the right to sell the product
  • you as a purchaser will be able to own the product without hassle
  • a third party isn't owed money for the product
  • when you buy something based on a description, you will receive something that matches that description
  • if you tell the seller how you want to use what you want to buy, and rely on the seller's skill or judgment in this area, what you buy will suit your needs in a reasonable way
  • when you buy something based on seeing a sample, the product you receive will match the sample in quality
  • the goods are in good quality to be sold, unless the seller has listed any defects
  • the goods are new and unused, unless the seller states that they are used
  • In the case of buying a service, you can assume that services will be performed in a skillful and workmanlike way.

Sometimes a seller will send you a product that you have not asked for. You do not have to pay for this product, even if you use it. A seller may not charge you if someone steals this product, nor for losing or damaging it.

Sellers are also not permitted to use negative option strategies. This is when the supplier tells you that they will start sending you a product or service after a certain date and that you will be responsible for paying for it unless you contact them to say you do not want the item or service.

It is not possible to sign away your rights under the Consumer Protection Act even if you sign a contract that says you have agreed to do something that is prohibited.